Is it safe for dogs to eat turkey? This is a common question among pet owners of the world. We know that dogs can safely eat dog foods containing beef, chicken, lamb, and fish, but what’s the verdict on turkey meal dog food? The short answer is yes, dogs can safely eat turkey.

Not only can they consume this animal protein, but there’s a good chance your dog will benefit from switching to a turkey-based dog food. In fact, recent animal studies are showing that turkey is one of the best, if not the best, animal proteins for canines.

The Health Benefits of Turkey for Canines

Consuming turkey has tons of health benefits. The first is that it’s an amazing source of protein, which is essential in a dog’s diet. Dog’s need protein for muscle growth and regeneration, as well as to stay energized. There are many forms of protein contained in dog foods, but turkey is one of the best. This is because it is a lean meat that is low in fat and cholesterol.

On top of that, turkey contains a few key nutrients that can help a dog stay healthy. Although it is low in calories, it is high in the element called Selenium. Consuming a hefty dose of Selenium can give the immune system a major boost. It also helps with mental clarity, reduces the risk of certain cancers, and is essential for thyroid health. Tryptophan is another element found in turkey meat, which also helps to boost a canine’s immune system.

Things to Keep in Mind When Feeding the Dog Real Turkey

If you opt to feed your dog real turkey meat rather than processed turkey meal dog food, there are a few things you should know beforehand. First of all, turkey is not toxic to dogs, not one bit, but when feeding real turkey meat, it is important to make sure that it is only meat. It is common for us as humans to dress up our turkeys with all the fixins’, especially on Thanksgiving, but this is not the type of turkey we should be feeding our dogs.

Plain turkey is perfectly fine for a canine. Heck, it’s more than just fine, it’s extremely beneficial to a canine’s overall health. When preparing a turkey for human consumption, though, we tend to slather the bird with butters, oils, herbs, and spices. These extra flavors make a turkey more delicious than ever, but that doesn’t mean your dog should be consuming them.

Any additional herbs, spices, and oils can lead to some major digestive issues in dogs, and can even cause a condition called pancreatitis. This is especially true when it comes to garlic; a dog’s digestive system can’t handle garlic the same way a human’s can. So if you plan on feeding your dog a bit of your cooked Thanksgiving bird, be sure to stick to just plain turkey. And remember, no bones.