Do you want to be able to save even more money when flying abroad for meetings? Here are the tax rules that apply to international business travel expenses.

Do you have a business? Or do you often travel regularly on business travel? If so, you’ll want to understand how as a small business owner you can claim back business expenses. 

If your international business trip will be considered “primarily business,” which means you can deduct the cost of transportation to and from another country you can claim it back. Even if you do not meet all of the conditions and even if the trip is not primarily for business purposes, you can still deduct part of travel expenses.     

Here’s everything you need to know.

Traveling Outside of the U.S

If you travel outside the United States and spend less than 25% of your working time abroad, you can deduct travel expenses on a pro-rata basis.
If your business trip lasts 7 consecutive days or less, you can deduct transportation costs.

These include airfares and taxis to and from the airport.
What if you spend more time for pleasure than on business? Say, seven days to relax and three days to visit clients? None of your travel expenses will be considered deductible.      

Travel Expenses From Your Company  

In any case, if the trip is connected to your company, you can deduct up to 100% of your travel expenses. If this is not the case, the general rule for foreign business trips is that you can deduct the cost of the return trip only as a percentage, provided that the primary reason was business.

You are exempt from the obligation to allocate if you significantly control the organization of the trip. If you do not meet this requirement, tax law requires that you split your travel expenses from your business and personal activities to determine what is deductible (for example, for a family car to a business destination, you can deduct the entire travel expenses).     

Individual Travel with Non-Business Activities 

Individual travel expenses abroad are not deductible if a person participates in essential non-business activities during the business trip.

For example, if you are on an accidental personal trip to visit your family or a side trip, expenses related to personal activities (e.g. Fuel miles to a hotel or a personal location) are not deductible as operating expenses. The deduction of expenses for business travel to the USA is only possible for business travel.     

Taxpayers who travel outside the United States for more than a week and spend less than 75% of their time in business are subject to the allocation rule, which prohibits their spending if they have no control over travel arrangements and the vacation share does not play a major role in the conduct of business travel. 

As a rule of thumb, all travel-related expenses during a business trip are deductible. Your travel expenses may be deductible as business expenses. It depends on whether the travel expenses between your place of residence and your company or workplace are necessary.    

Business travel expenses are travel expenses associated with the running of a business and expenses incurred when you are located outside your principal place of business, which is referred to as your tax home.

Operating Expenses 

The deductibility of operating expenses depends on whether the trip takes place in the United States or outside the United States. The IRS defines business travel as traveling away from home during a long, ordinary working day when you need to sleep and rest at home.

You cannot deduct the costs of family members traveling with you if they are employees of your company unless the trip has a good business purpose.     

Here’s what CPA says you should know before making a reservation: if you travel for a mix of business and personal activities outside of the U.S, you can deduct up to 100% of the travel expenses for business travel. If you are traveling for business, renting a car is a necessary and common expense.

You can also deduct your business mileage and rental costs if others join you for the trip. The attraction is that if you travel abroad for work purposes, you cannot deduct all the cost of traveling abroad for non-business purposes to a foreign country even if you consider it a business purpose.     

Combine a Business Trip With a Vacation  

If you are traveling on business and combine a business trip with a vacation to offset the costs, tax deductions may sound tempting. However, you can deduct the cost of taking friends and family on business trips, unless the cost is charged. Travel expenses to congresses are business tax filings that are deductible if you can prove that your participation benefits your business.  

This means that if you fly to London for four days and visit the sights for two days, your travel costs are deductible. Allocate does not apply if you are in the United States for more than a week and spend less than a quarter of your time on non-business activities.

Daily Living Expenses 

If you are eligible, you can deduct transportation costs and daily living expenses on working days (subject to the 50% rule for meals) if you qualify. These common and necessary principles can help you make better decisions about whether your small business travel expenses should be deductible.      

This article answers frequently asked questions about deducting smart business travel expenses, but the general discussion about business travel expenses is not intended as tax or legal advice.

Due to space constraints, this article does not deal with nuances related to international tax deductions for business travel, such as special arrangements for attending business congresses outside the U.S. It’s important to check these so you aren’t investigated for tax avoidance.

However, if you hire a consultant that deals with global PEO, you can be sure that travel tax deductions can be used as everyday business expenses.

Business Travel Is Great

Business travel is great. But it can be even greater if you can claim back your expenses from your business.

Be sure to do your research before your trip to figure out all the exemptions so you can claim back all the money you are entitled to.

For more tips and advice, be sure to check out the rest of our site.